Blog30

Celebrating the members of the League of Professional Theatre Women

Archive for the month “April, 2012”

Lanie Zipoy

Lanie Zipoy, member of the League of Professional Theatre WomenProducer/Publicist
New York, New York USA

Where do you look for inspiration? My friends, the tennis court, theater

What’s your favorite book?  
In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez tops my favorite books.

movie? I love the films, Earth As Seen from the Moon by Pasolini, Angela by Rebecca Miller, Simple Men by Hal Hartley and The City of Lost Children by Caro & Jeunet.

line from a play? “We Belong To Each Other.” — Mac Rogers’ Universal Robots

pop culture guilty pleasure? The Glades is one of my guilty pleasures. It’s sunny, slightly funny and doesn’t tax the brain. Love it.

cocktail? Margaritas. Good, delicious, mouth-watering margaritas make me happy.  I’m particularly a fan of guava and passionfruit.

What play or production changed your life? Justice Do It. A one-night only performance by fifth graders on Broadway in 1997. The New Jersey elementary students researched globalization and child labor, and then wrote an entertaining play about McDonald’s, Nike and other conglomerates based on their research. Their school’s principal deemed the work too controversial, and banned the students from performing it. Scott Ellis read about the student’s plight in the newspaper, offered to direct them and convinced Roundabout to produce the play for one night only. After hearing about the production’s background on NPR, I snagged a couple of tickets and thoroughly enjoyed watching the 10-year-olds hit their marks (and perform with glee). I will never forget that night.

Is there anything you still dream of doing? Going to the Australian Open.

I feel most like myself when I ….rollerskate or volunteer.

What is your best escape? Tennis. Playing, watching, and enjoying tennis.

What’s the one thing nobody knows about you? I did a lot of genetic research at major institutions in my teens. I wanted to be a scientist until I was subjected to listening to Rush Limbaugh all summer long in a lab I worked in.

Lanie Zipoy is the co-founder of Voices Inside/Out, an theatrical exchange program in prisons. Producer credits include: Universal Robots, 23 Feet in 12 Minutes, The Riverside Symphony. Lanie is a member of TRU’s Career Producers Group, and the NYIT Awards Honorary Awards Committee as well as a Huffington Post contributor.

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Carolyn Feleppa Balducci

Carolyn Balducci, member of League of Professional Theatre WomenWriter, Lyricist
Montauk, New York USA

Where do you look for inspiration?
… I don’t really look. Ideas seem to find me.

What’s your favorite book / movie / play ?
I’m an ominivore. If I actually had one single most favorite book, movie or play,
I probably would never admit it.

Favorite quotes –
“Yes, I did see Mr. Peabody, but I didn’t see him. That is, I didn’t see him really. Yes, I spoke to him twice, but I didn’t talk to him.”  — Bringing Up Baby

‘That is the case with us all, papa. One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.’ – Emma

Guilty pleasures?
…The New York Times’ Metropolitan Diary on Mondays. Croissants. Coffee with cream.

What play or production changed your life?
Arlecchino, il servitore di due padroni by Carlo Goldoni. Directed by Giorgio Strehler at the Piccolo Teatro di Milano.

Is there anything you still dream of doing?
…Re-reading the books on my shelves.

Upcoming Event – for the LPTW 30 plays in 30 years celebration —
GIOVANNI THE FEARLESS a commedia dell’arte folk opera (Music by Mira J. Spektor; my book & lyrics). SYMPHONY SPACE – Thalia/Nimoy Theatre – June 7th at 7:30.

I feel most like myself when I ….
…hear people laughing. Especially if they’re laughing at my jokes.

What is your best escape?
…the beach

What’s the one thing nobody knows about you?
…. that once upon a time I met the King of Sweden.

Carolyn Feleppa Balducci: Author of novels, biographies, poetry, screenplays & plays. Creative Writing faculty, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1977-2002). Translator/adaptor of contemporary and classical comedies such as Lysistrata, La Calandra, La Veniexiana. Screenplays & plays: Otto of the Silver Hand, Best Interest, Hamptons Quartet, Old Rat’s Promise, Giovanni the Fearless.

Enid Futterman

Enid Futterman, member of the League of Professional Theatre WomenLyricist/Book Writer
Claverack, New York USA

I love theaters almost as much as I love theater, especially old theaters, especially endangered old theaters. I was arrested standing next to Susan Sarandon just before the Morosco and the Helen Hayes were demolished to make way for a Marriott. (A theater meant to compensate was built right into the hotel – a cavernous place not even a stage mother could love.)

The plays that inspired me to write were musical plays—Carousel (which I fell for at 6, at camp), West Side Story, Sunday in the Park with George, The Light in the Piazza. You get the picture—the hopelessly and hopefully romantic. So the rooms that echo with the music of the American Popular Songbook, once identical to the music of the American Musical Theater, are as precious to me as theaters, and as theatrical. None more so than the Oak Room, the quintessence of cabaret, and the site of more enchanted evenings than I can count, but will not forget. When the news came from, you guessed it, Marriott, that the Oak Room would not reopen after renovation with the rest of the Algonquin Hotel, but instead become a “breakfast nook” for Elite Marriott Rewards members, it felt like a fatal wound to New York’s idiosyncratic heart.

Once again, I’m fighting a quixotic battle against the same Goliath, but with a better weapon–the Internet. I wrote a petition with Vicki Stivala (who is writing a whole book about the Oak Room), and like the social media butterflies we’ve become, promote it relentlessly on Facebook and Twitter.

More than 3000 people have signed, commented (eloquently and urgently), shared, tweeted, and forwarded, including dozens of fellow theater women. There is much favorable press (Back Stage, NPR, QXR, HuffPo, blogs, podcasts), the Oak Room was named a Place That Matters by the Municipal Art Society, Community Board 5 is poised to recommend to management that the room be used for cabaret again, and the latest word from management: “it’s not off the table.”

Oh, and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQijQaIIY4U&feature=youtu.be

Enid Futterman wrote Book and Lyrics for Yours, Anne, Portrait of Jennie, and An Open Window, and text for song cycles I am Anne Frank and I Remember. She writes theater criticism for Our Town, which she co-publishes and edits, and holds an MFA in Musical Theater Writing from NYU.

Jill BC Du Boff

Jill BC Du Boff, League of Professional Theatre Women memberSound Designer
New York, New York USA

Where do I look for inspiration? As a sound designer, music is really important to me, I try to listen to as much music as possible, which is also the most fun part of my job. I listen to the content, the mix and the feeling the music evokes. I find music to be inspirational.

Two plays changed my life, Poona The F**kdog and other plays for Children written by Jeff Goode and produced by the Adobe Theatre Company, and The Grey Zone by Tim Blake Nelson produced by MCC. Poona taught me how to really think outside of the box and how to invent sound and The Grey Zone taught me about subtlety and how powerful sound can be in live theatre.

My favorite ways to escape are running, reading and knitting. Sometimes listening to music, but only sometimes, since it can also feel like work.

My favorite book: The History of Love by Nicole Krause
Line from a play; “Come to my tent, we sing songs” Epic Proportions
Pop Culture Guilty Pleasure: The Simpsons
Cocktail: Dirty Vodka Martini

Jill BC Du Boff is a theatrical sound designer, her interests span film, television, radio, podcasts and audio tours. She has designed on Broadway and off as well as regionally and has received the Ruth Morley award from the LPTW, an Obie for Sustained Excellence in sound design and was nominated for two Drama Desk Awards. She will be marrying Adam Lerman on May 20th.

Olga de la Fuente

Olga de la Fuente, member of the League of Professional Theatre WomenWriter, shower singer
New York, New York USA

Where do you look for inspiration?
The characters in my family will always provide interesting stories. They’re surreal, like my country. But don’t tell them I said this.

What’s your favorite Book:
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. It feeds the child inside me. It’s also filled with the most beautiful life lessons — my favorite being the one with the fox, who taught me the importance of rituals in life.

Favorite Movie:
Anything by Hayao Miyazaki. He’s got strong female characters, magical elements, a wild imagination, multidimensional villains, hand-drawn animation… What else do you need?

Favorite Line from a play:
“Cielos, si es verdad que sueño, suspendedme la memoria, que no es posible que quepan en un sueño tantas cosas.” Pedro Calderón de la Barca, La vida es sueño
(My apologies. I cannot find a decent translation.)

Favorite Pop culture guilty pleasure:
Watching America’s Next Top Model reruns. Tyra’s speech to the girl who’s going home never gets old.

Favorite Cocktail:
Mezcal, which is not really a cocktail.

What play or production changed your life?
La vida es sueño (Life is a dream), by Pedro Calderón de la Barca.

Is there anything you still dream of doing?
Founding the first nocturnal kindergarten right on top of my upstairs neighbor. That, or a Flamenco dance academy.

I feel most like myself when I ….
When I’m with the people I love.

What is your best escape?
Life would be unbearable without a sense of humor. Then there’s music, books, cinema, the sea, and the most beautiful place in the world: a town in Mexico called Valle de Bravo.

What’s the one thing nobody knows about you?
Back in the 1920s, I created a time-traveling device that would take me to the 21st century. The problem is, I lost the keys and now I’m stuck in the digital age. Email me if you find my keys.

Olga de la Fuente was born and raised in Mexico City. Has an M.F.A. in Dramatic Writing from NYU, Tisch School of the Arts, where she was awarded a Dean’s Fellowship. Has written for television and theatre (7 sins in 60 minutes), as well as the occasional film review. Currently developing an animated television show and a web series.

Week in Review, April 9 – 15, 2012


LPTW’s Blog30 was created to highlight the diversity, passion and brilliance of the individual members of the League of Professional Theatre Women in celebration of the organization’s 30th Anniversary. Every Sunday, the women featured in the previous six days, as well as three others from our first two months, receive a little more attention, a second chance for readers to learn about them. Sunday is often a day for reflection, offering the opportunity to catch up on the previous week’s activities. Now, the Week in Review gives our readers the opportunity to experience a week’s entries in one easy sitting. We hope you enjoy the latest addition to Blog30.

A guy walked onto the otherwise bare stage, started off “The day I got the Chekhov story in the mail,” and then kept talking for 20 minutes about going to the Sizzler and the sleeping woman and lots of other stuff I don’t remember but which seemed both random and profound. – Susan Bernfield, April 9

That’s why it’s so important to see things, to read things, to go to workshops. Not to “get ideas,” but to give your own ideas something to grow against. – Katie Pearl, April 10

I haven’t done nearly enough international travel and often daydream of strapping on a backpack and disappearing for months. – Jessi D. Hill, April 11

It was a production of King Lear set near the North Pole. I didn’t understand much of the story other than there was a king, and people argued with him. – Anne Phelan, April 12

The most exciting thing about founding and running a theater company is building a true ensemble to give voice to a story that would otherwise remain unheard. – Chelsea Silverman, April 13

What’s the one thing nobody knows about you? I used to be a DJ here in NYC in lower east side clubs. – Kristin Marting, April 14

From the Archives:
I wish I could fix all the problems in the world, and make all people live in harmony. – Alexa Kelly, January 7

Make me a Bloody Mary tha satiates me to the core and I might just want to share the rest of my life with you. – Robin Rothstein, January 14

Surrounded by artists working in refugee camps, with trauma victims, in war zones, across disputed boundaries, and under severe censorship and repression, my definitions of what theatre or drama could be were expanding and forcing me to re-envision my role as an artist. – Roberta Levitow, January 21

Kristin Marting

Kristin Marting, member of the League of Professional Theatre WomenDirector / Artistic Director of HERE
New York, New York USA

Where do you look for inspiration?
All around this awesome city every day.

What’s your favorite cocktail?
A glass of Argentinian Malbec

What play or production changed your life?
The Seven Deadly Sins – Pina Bausch

I feel most like myself when I am directing. In rehearsal, I fuse all of my different strengths together into a creative force. I love the rich and evolving collaborative process with the performers, designers and writers and uncovering the patterns that will get us where we need to go.

What is your best escape?
Going to the farmer’s market on Saturday morning, seeing what deliciousness all my farmer friends have brought and cooking up an exciting gourmet lunch for my family

What’s the one thing nobody knows about you?
I used to be a DJ here in NYC in lower east side clubs.

Kristin Marting is a director of hybrid work. Over the last 20 years, she has constructed 26 works for the stage. She is a co-founder and Artistic Director of HERE, where she cultivates artists and programs all events – including 17 OBIE-award winners—for an annual audience of 30,000.

Chelsea Silverman

Chelsea Silverman, member of the League of Professional Theatre WomenProducer, Actor
New York, New York USA

I am inspired by collaboration. I am a firm believer that the whole is always greater than the sum of its parts. The most exciting thing about founding and running a theater company is building a true ensemble to give voice to a story that would otherwise remain unheard. To go from reading a new play in a quiet room on your own to a realized production is a fascinating journey. To gather a group of creative people and offer them the opportunity to create — even on a tight budget — and steward the growth of the piece, keeping egos in check, talent fostered and commitment to the process at a high level is always both challenging and rewarding.

As far as favorite things go…. Currently my favorite series is the Flavia De Luce books by Alan Bradley. He is able to capture the honest and original voice of a twelve-year-old girl solving murders in the English countryside in the 1950s. I love stories that have a clear sense of time and place — be it book, movie or play — and these are the type of stories 3Graces sets out to produce.

My guilty pleasures, if you must know, are dark chocolate covered almonds from Trader Joe’s…. and a great (or even decent) bottle of red wine. Never white.

Chelsea Silverman is a founder and the Executive Director of 3Graces Theater Co., an award-winning off-off Broadway theater company committed to telling women’s stories on stage.

Anne Phelan

Anne Phelan, member of the League of Professional Theatre WomenPlaywright/Dramaturg
Brooklyn, New York USA

What production changed my life?
When I was 6 or 7, my parents took me to see a touring company at John Carroll, the local Jesuit university. I’m not sure what theatre it was; probably not The Acting Company, maybe Catholic University still toured then. And sadly, no idea whom the director and designers were, either.

It was a production of King Lear set near the North Pole. I didn’t understand much of the story other than there was a king, and people argued with him. All the actors were in Inuit dress; I distinctly remember the mukluks, and a dog-less dogsled. The set was a series of flats shaped like eight-foot high gothic windows: the frames were black, and where the glass would normally be were pieces of parchment. The parchment and the scrim were lit with shifting colored lights, to look like the aurora borealis. I had seen the northern lights — when I lived in Cleveland, they were visible some nights in August. So to me, that stage looked incredibly familiar and mysterious at the same time. And I wanted to know how to get there.

Two-time Edward F. Albee Foundation Fellow, Anne Phelan has been a guest at The Juilliard School, Playwright-in-Residence at the William Inge Theatre Festival, and her plays have been produced throughout the U.S. Four of her plays are in Smith & Kraus’ “Best Ten-Minute Plays.” Member, The Dramatists Guild. www.annephelan.com

Jessi D. Hill

Jessi D. Hill, member of the League of Professional Theatre WomenFreelance Director and Associate Artistic Director of terraNOVA Collective
New York, New York USA

Where do you look for inspiration?
I look for inspiration in conversations with playwrights I work with. Hearing what they’re working on and why they’re writing plays is inspiring. For myself, I often seek inspiration in my neighborhood. I live a hop, skip and jump from the Brooklyn Museum, Prospect Park and The Brooklyn Botanic Gardens. I visit one of these places almost every day.

What play or production changed your life?
In my early 20s I saw Tina Landau’s production of The Time of Your Life at Steppenwolf. It was a wonderfully acted, beautiful production that I’ll never forget (and I often think of).

Is there anything you still dream of doing?
I haven’t done nearly enough international travel and often daydream of strapping on a backpack and disappearing for months.

I feel most like myself when I ….
Am directing or hiking in the mountains of Colorado or running…

What’s the one thing nobody knows about you?
I wouldn’t say nobody but not everybody: I’m a runner and have been doing it more and more competitively over the last 5 years. I just registered for my second marathon. I try to run at least 30 miles a week.

Jessi D. Hill is a freelance director and Associate Artistic Director of terraNOVA Collective in New York. New play projects include work at The Women’s Project, New York Theatre Workshop, Primary Stages, The New Group, Culture Project, New Dramatists, The Lark, The Playwrights Realm, New Georges, and others. MFA Directing: Yale. SDC. Upcoming projects: www.jessidhill.com

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